2015-02-27 15:42:45

Democracy Now! - February 27, 2015

Advocates of a free and open Internet are celebrating a vote Thursday by the Federal Communications Commission to approve strong net neutrality rules. The move bans "paid prioritization" by Internet service providers who seek to charge extra fees from content producers, as well as blocking and throttling of lawful content. The new rules will also apply to mobile access. The vote is seen as a major victory for grassroots advocacy groups — including Fight for the Future, Demand Progress, Free Press, Color of Change and Center for Media Justice — who have spent years campaigning to preserve an open Internet. We speak to longtime open Internet advocate Tim Wu. He is a policy advocate and Columbia University law professor who is known for coining the term "net neutrality" back in 2002.

Video has surfaced showing militants from the Islamic State destroying ancient artifacts at a museum in the Iraqi city of Mosul. Men are seen toppling statues and using sledgehammers and drills to destroy the artifacts. The Guardian reports one of the statues destroyed was a winged-bull Assyrian protective deity that dates back to the 9th century B.C. The Islamic State has also reportedly destroyed the Mosul public library, which housed more than 8,000 rare books and manuscripts. On Thursday,UNESCO, the cultural arm of the United Nations, called for the U.N. Security Council to hold an emergency meeting on protecting Iraq’s cultural heritage. "I condemn this as a deliberate attack against Iraq’s millennial history and culture, and as an inflammatory incitement to violence and hatred," said UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova. We speak to Zainab Bahrani, professor of Near Eastern and East Mediterranean art and archeology at Columbia University. She has worked extensively in Iraq, including periods as senior adviser to Iraq’s Ministry of Culture and aUNESCO consultant.

Authorities in Pasco, Washington, have revealed police fired 17 shots at Antonio Zambrano-Montes, an unarmed Mexican farmworker who was shot dead on February 10. Cellphone video shows Zambrano turning to face police and raising his hands before he is shot. The shooting has sparked weeks of protests. Live from Pasco, we speak with Felix Vargas, chairman of Consejo Latino, a group of local businessmen in Pasco who are working with Zambrano’s family. We also talk to Jennifer Shaw, deputy director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington state and a member of the Community Police Commission in Seattle.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker made headlines Thursday when he compared the Islamic State to pro-labor protesters in Wisconsin. A top Republican presidential contender, Walker made the comment at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) when asked about the Islamic State. "If I can take on 100,000 protesters, I can do the same across the globe," Walker told the audience. Meanwhile, Walker has announced plans to sign an anti-union right-to-work bill that would eliminate the requirement that workers must pay union fees. On Wednesday, the Wisconsin State Senate passed the measure on a mostly party-line vote of 17 to 15. The Republican-controlled State Assembly is expected to pass the legislation next week. We speak to Madison-based journalist John Nichols of The Nation. He is author of "Uprising: How Wisconsin Renewed the Politics of Protest, from Madison to Wall Street."

Full episodes of Democracy Now! can be viewed at the link: https://www.freespeech.org/collection/democracy-now.






Amy Goodman Democracy Now! Islam Net Neutrality

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