2014-10-08 14:32:32

Democracy Now! October 8, 2014

We broadcast from San Antonio, which is now the last outpost for legal abortion in southern Texas. Last week, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals allowed a provision requiring abortion providers to meet hospital-style building requirements to come into immediate effect, effectively gutting abortion access overnight. The move shuttered 13 clinics and left just eight open in a state that once had more than 40 facilities. On Monday, a number of abortion providers filed an emergency application asking the Supreme Court to intervene. The provision is part of HB2, a sweeping anti-choice law passed last summer after it was initially blocked by a people’s filibuster and an 11-hour stand from Texas State Sen. Wendy Davis. We speak with two guests: Jeffrey Hons, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood South Texas, which is building a new facility in San Antonio that meets the new regulations, and Lindsay Rodriguez, president of the Lilith Fund, which provides grants to Texans who need abortions but cannot afford them.

Broadcasting from San Antonio, we look at a new family detention center just south of the city that holds more than 500 immigrant women and their children as they await deportation. The for-profit Karnes County Residential Center is owned by the GEO Group, the second-largest private prison company in the United States. Many women imprisoned at the Karnes facility have accused guards of sexually assaulting them. A federal complaint filed last week says guards are promising the women help with their immigration cases in return for sexual favors. Many of the detainees came to the United States seeking asylum from violence in their home countries of Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador. But the Obama administration says it is detaining them in order to discourage more migrants from coming. We hear from one of the facility’s few detainees to be released since a wave of migrants arrived in August, an El Salvador national who came with her 7-year-old daughter, who suffers from brain cancer. We also speak to Javier Maldonado, an immigration attorney involved in the detainees’ case alleging sexual assault and poor conditions, and Cristina Parker, the immigration projects coordinator for Grassroots Leadership and co-author of their new report, "For-Profit Family Detention: Meet the Private Prison Corporations Making Millions by Locking Up Refugee Families."

Broadcasting from Trinity University, we speak with Graciela Sánchez, director of the Esperanza Peace and Justice Center, which is going on its 28th year as a community gathering space in San Antonio, Texas. The center recently hosted an exhibit on fracking, "Frack-aso! Portraits of Extraction in Eagle Ford and Beyond." The Eagle Ford Shale is the site of a massive fracking project in the local area — the flares burning off excess natural gas can be seen by satellite at night. Sánchez also talks about grassroots efforts to demilitarize their community.

Amy Goodman Democracy Now! Fracking Migrants Reproductive Rights

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