vladimir putin

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What's Up with Liberals on Russia and Putin?

Bill Scher, Senior Writer at Campaign For America's Future, joins David to discuss strains of the left wing who support Vladimir Putin's actions. Broadcast on April 3, 2014.

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Crimea Joins Russia

Huffington Post, Politics Reporter, Luke Johnson talks with Bill Press about Crimea becoming a part of Russia.

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As Crimea Threatens Secession, Does East West Split Hasten Ukraine's Political Divide?

Russian President Vladimir Putin is rebuffing warnings from the U.S. and European Union as the crisis in Ukraine threatens one of the worst east-west standoffs since the Cold War. The pro-Russian Crimean Parliament has voted to hold a referendum on splitting off from Ukraine and joining Russia. But the vote's legitimacy has been called into question after the installation of a pro-Russian government in Crimea just last week.

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Democracy Now! 2014-03-07 Friday

Russian President Vladimir Putin is rebuffing warnings from the U.S. and European Union as the crisis in Ukraine threatens one of the worst east-west standoffs since the Cold War. The pro-Russian Crimean Parliament has voted to hold a referendum on splitting off from Ukraine and joining Russia. But the vote’s legitimacy has been called into question after the installation of a pro-Russian government in Crimea just last week. We host a roundtable discussion with three guests: Anton Shekhovtsov, a Ukrainian citizen and researcher at the University College London specializing in far-right movements; Jonathan Steele, former Moscow correspondent for The Guardian and author of "Eternal Russia: Yeltsin, Gorbachev, and the Mirage of Democracy"; and Keith Gessen, an editor at n+1 magazine who covered the 2010 Ukraine elections for The New Yorker.

The ongoing protests in Venezuela have left at least 20 people dead since breaking out last month. Both sides have staged massive rallies, with opponents accusing President Nicolas Maduro of authoritarianism and mishandling the economy and supporters backing his continuation of Hugo Chavez’s legacy of social welfare. Maduro has bristled at outside attempts to intervene. We host a debate on who is protesting in Venezuela, and why, with two guests: Margarita López Maya, a Venezuelan historian and political analyst with the Center for Development Studies at the Central University of Venezuela; and Roberto Lovato, a writer with New American Media who recently returned from reporting in Caracas.

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A Coup or a Revolution? Ukraine Seeks Arrest of Ousted President Following Deadly Street Protests

Ukraine is in a state of crisis two days after the country's democratically elected president was ousted following months of street protests that left at least 82 people dead. On Saturday, Ukraine's Parliament voted to remove President Viktor Yanukovych, a move Yanukovych described as a coup. Earlier today, Ukraine's new leaders announced the ousted president was wanted for mass murder of peaceful protesters. Russia condemned the move to oust Yanukovych and recalled its ambassador to Ukraine. Meanwhile, Europe has embraced the new government. European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton is traveling to Ukraine today to discuss measures to shore up Ukraine's ailing economy. One of Yanukovych's main rivals, former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, was released from custody.

Media of Type video

Media Coverage is Distorting Russia

Stephen Cohen, The Nation Magazine joins Thom Hartmann to talk about how the media is more interested in covering Russia during these winter olympics then the games themselves.

Media of Type video

Debate: Is Ukraine's Opposition a Democratic Movement or a Force of Right Wing Extremism?

Ukrainian anti-government protesters have rejected an amnesty bill aimed at ending the country's political unrest, refusing to vacate occupied government buildings and dismantle their street blockades in exchange for the release of jailed activists. The demonstrations in the Ukraine are collectively referred to as "Euromaidan." They began in late November after President Viktor Yanukovych reversed his decision to sign a long-awaited trade deal with the European Union to forge stronger ties with Russia instead. While the Ukrainian opposition has been hailed in the West as a democratic, grassroots movement, DN! hosts a debate on whether the rush to back opponents of Russian President Vladimir Putin obscures a more complex reality beneath the surface.

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Obama Losing Support with Syria Questions Still Looming

Politico Reporter, Hadas Gold, joins Bill Press to talk about what's going on with Syria and how Obama is losing support even from his more loyal supporters.

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Analyzing Obama's Speech and Possible Diplomacy with Syria

Will Dobson, Politics & Foreign Affairs Editor of Slate joins Bill Press to analyze President Obama's speech discussing Syria, and the likelihood that Assad will turn over chemical weapons to Putin.

Media of Type video

Democracy Now! 2013-09-11 Wednesday

In a national address from the White House Tuesday night, President Obama announced he is delaying a plan to strike Syria while pursuing a diplomatic effort from Russia for international monitors to take over and destroy Syria’s arsenal of chemical weapons. However, Obama still threatened to use force against Syria if the plan fails. We get reaction to Obama’s speech from world-renowned political dissident and linguist, MIT Professor Emeritus Noam Chomsky. "The Russian plan is a godsend for Obama," Chomsky says. "It saves him from what would look like a very serious defeat. He has not been able to obtain virtually any international support, and it looked as though Congress wasn’t going to support it either, which would leave him completely out on a limb. This leaves him a way out: He can maintain the threat of force, which incidentally is a crime under international law. We should bear in mind that the core principle of the United Nations Charter bars the threat or use of force. So all of this is criminal, to begin with, but he’ll continue with that."

Noam Chomsky, the world-renowned political dissident, linguist and author, weighs in on today’s 12th anniversary of the September 11, 2001, attacks and how the civil war in Syria appears destined to permanently break the country apart. "[9/11] was very significant, a major terrorist act, thousands of people killed," Chomsky says. "It’s the first time since the War of 1812 that U.S. territory had been attacked. The United States has had remarkable security, and therefore was, aside from the horrible atrocity, a very significant, historical event. And it changed attitudes and policies in the United States quite considerably. And in reaction to this, the government was able to ram through laws that sharply constrained civil liberties. It was able to provide pretexts for the invasion of Afghanistan, invasion of Iraq — the destruction of Iraq, with consequences that spread through the region. And it’s the basis for Obama’s massive terrorist war, the drone war, the most extreme terrorist campaign that’s underway now, maybe most extreme in history, and the justification for it is the same: the second 9/11, 9/11/2001. So, yes, it’s had enormous effects on society, on attitudes, on policies. Many victims throughout the world can testify to that." On Syria, Chomsky says the country "is plunging into suicide. If negotiations [don’t] work, Syria is moving towards a kind of very bloody partition."

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